Lithuanian watermills in the 15th and 16th century: a slow technological revolution
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Lithuanian watermills in the 15th and 16th century: a slow
technological revolution
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Eugenijus Saviščevas | ldkistorija.lt 2017 november 17 d. 17:01

Ancient civilisations already knew how to use the energy of
running water, but it was the Western European civilisation
that developed a vast network of watermills during the
Middle Ages. The abundance of swift-running rivers and
constant increase of crop areas in Europe were the two
important factors behind the spread of watermills that
eventually got involved in various technological processes,
including smithing, papermaking, wood processing and
groundwater regulation. In technical sense, history of
Western watermills apparently developed independently from
the experience of other civilisations, although the initial
impulses might have arrived from elsewhere.

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https://en.delfi.lt/archive/article.php?id=76386125

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