The Baltic automobile market experienced strong growth in 2015 with 52,058 new cars registered last year, or 7.9% more than in 2014.
© Bendrovės archyvas

Lithuania was the biggest growth market for new cars with an 18.2% increase year on year. Latvians registered 9.9% more new cars last year than in 2014 before, while in Estonia the new car market contracted by 0.5%.

However, Estonians still bought more cars than Latvians or Lithuanians last year. Lithuanians registered 17,085 new cars, Latvians, 13,887, and Estonians, 21,113, according to the DataCentre.

Although Estonia has the smallest population (1.3 million, compared to Latvia's 2 million and Lithuania's 2.9 million), it accounts for 40.5% of all new cars sold in the Baltics.

Estonians also lead in new car purchases by capita, with 16.2 cars per 1,000 people, almost three times more than in Lithuania (5.7) and more than double the level in Latvia (6.9).

The most popular brand with Baltic drivers was Toyota, which sold 6,271 new cars last year. It was followed by Volkswagen, Nissan, and Škoda. Fiat, the most popular brand for new cars in Lithuania, was number five in the Baltics overall.

The Nissan Qashqai, Fiat 500 and Škoda Octavia were the top three most popular car models with Baltic buyers.

Lzinios.lt

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