This coming May, 800 delegates from over 51 countries will travel to Jerusalem not to enjoy the sunny Israeli weather but rather to discuss the prolonged eclipse that has clouded the streets of Europe in growing intensity in recent times.
Jerusalem
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The 5th Global Forum for Combating Anti-Semitism (GFCA) will convene this month (12-14 May) in Jerusalem to discuss the renewed threat to Jewish communities and individuals around the globe.

The conference will be highly attended by representatives of different countries of Europe and elsewhere. Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Lithuania Mantvydas Bekešius and some of his colleagues will be joining them in this year conference.

In the same week that Europe celebrates the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, these concerned delegates will gather in Israel’s capital to try and understand how the seven-decades-old vow of "Never Again" has been forgotten by so many.

In recent years, there has been a measurable rise in antisemitic violence directed toward Jewish individuals, communities, institutions, schools and synagogues in Europe and elsewhere.

The Global Forum for Combating Antisemitism (GFCA) is the premier biennial gathering for assessing the global extent of antisemitic phenomena and then formulating effective societal and governmental responses.

The GFCA is an active coalition of public figures, political leaders, leading members of civil society, clergy, journalists, diplomats, educators and concerned citizens dedicated to advancing tolerance and defeating antisemitism and other forms of racial and ethnic hatred. The forum serves as an important meeting place for the exchange of knowledge and for formulating a global work plan.

This year’s Global Forum will focus on two main themes. The first is the spread of the “oldest hatred” through the newest mediums, as antisemitic material is freely disseminated on the internet and via social media. These new forms of global interconnectedness have given us unprecedented tools to acquire knowledge and advance free expression; however, they can also present unprecedented challenges to human dignity. Unfiltered cyberhate - including antisemitic hate speech, strategies, plans and campaigns - can now be delivered directly and discretely to portable devices. The question then arises of how we can increase the moral integrity of the internet without limiting its essential freedom.

The second focus will be on the recent revival of antisemitism in Europe and the search for effective responses. Many issues are to be examined, among them the question of why this is happening in Europe now. What steps can be taken by the leadership in Europe to defeat the new wave of antisemitism in their cities? Is there a structural threat to Jewish life?

These questions and more will be discussed in an open atmosphere and in a practical manner. The GFCA seeks concrete actions, both those with immediate effect and measures that will bear fruit in the long run.

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