Lithuanian Prime Minister Saulius Skvernelis expects wages to rise in the future as local businesses will face competition for workers from foreign-owned companies.
© DELFI / Šarūnas Mažeika

"The average salary in foreign-owned companies amounts to 1,200 euros. Our businesses will have no way of avoiding it, because competition in the labor market is huge. With increasing labor productivity, efficiency, technological upgrades, salaries have to grow," Skvernelis said on LRT Radio on Tuesday morning.

"Jobs paying such a salary (of 1,000 euros) are available in the market today, but employers sometimes have problems finding people who not only want, but, most importantly, can do the job," he added.

According to the latest figures from Statistics Lithuania, average gross monthly wages in Lithuania's economy, excluding sole proprietorships, rose by 8.7 percent in the second quarter of 2017 compared with a year ago to reach 838.7 euros. Average net monthly wages grew by 9.7 percent year-on-year to 659 euros.

Quarter-on-quarter, gross wages rose by 2.6 percent and net wages were up by 2.2 percent,

Real wages edged up by 0.4 percent over the quarter and were up by 6 percent over the year.

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