On Friday, 14 November, The Invisible Front was presented at The Music Box Theatre, which is Chicago’s premiere venue for independent and foreign films. The story of one of the twentieth century’s most significant underground resistance movements attracted a packed hall of Lithuanians residing in the region.
The Invisible Front presented to audiences in Chicago

Chicago’s Lithuanian Consul General, Marijus Gudynas, presented the award-winning film and underlined that he was proud to see it in a part of America which is home to the largest Lithuanian community outside Lithuania. Mr. Gudynas told the audience that it was essential to tell the history of Lithuania and, particularly, the story of the Lithuanian resistance movement.

After screening The Invisible Front, the filmmakers told the audience that they sought to make a film about human character and the ability to make tough choices in tough circumstances. Jonas Ohman emphasized: “What is happening in Ukraine, after making this film and knowing the “plot” of Russian imperialism, has come as no surprise to us. It is basically the same story, so to speak, repeating itself.”

All guests were given green wristbands which have become the genuine symbol of the fight for freedom and has spread worldwide from Lithuania. The green wristband movement was initiated to pay tribute to the legacy of the “Forest Brothers”, as anti-Soviet partisans were known.

The Invisible Front is a film about love and the fight for freedom. In 1944, Soviet forces occupied Lithuania for a second time in less than five years. This time the youth of the nation chose to fight back and formed a guerrilla army of partisans called the Forest Brothers. Among them was a charismatic leader named Juozas Luksa who joined the resistance with his three brothers. Having realized that the pen was mightier than the sword Luksa risked his life to escape to Paris in 1948 to spread the word of the partisan struggle. In Paris, Luksa quickly joined up with western intelligence agencies, wrote a memoir and met the love of his life: Nijole. Shorlty after their wedding, Luksa, was air-dropped back into Soviet Lithuania by the CIA to help liberate his country. The Invisible Front uses Luksa’s writings and his love letters to Nijole to tell the story of the Lithuanian resistance.

The Invisible Front is playing in Chicago from 14 November at the Music Box Cinema. The filmmakers, Vincas Sruoginis, Jonas Ohman and Mark Johnston, will be attending screenings on 15 November and 16 November and will tour to Los Angeles from 21 November.

Official homepage of the film: www.theinvisiblefront.com

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