Artillery shells, mines and grenades are only a small part of dangerous explosives that prevented the work of laying the submarine power link from Lithuania to Sweden. Explosives were found in the Lithuanian territory during the work on the project. These explosives were neutralised by explosive ordnance disposal personnel of the Lithuanian Armed Forces. However, experts predict that more explosives might be discovered.
NordBalt cable laying ships
© Bendrovės archyvas

According to the statement issued by the Association for Prevention of War Legacy Threats (Karo Palikimo Grėsmės Prevencija), professionals have a few ideas on the origin of explosives. Most likely they are the legacy of the Second World War. If one of the explosives was to explode, it could cause damage to equipment, the cable or endanger people's lives.

Five members of the ordnance disposal team of the Lithuanian Armed Forces plan to finish their job by the end of August 2014.

The 450-kilometer 700-megawatt cable between Lithuania and Sweden, known as NordBalt, will be the third-longest submarine link in the world. The construction of the cable is planned to be completed by the end of 2015.

It is forbidden to copy the text of this publication without a written permission from ELTA.

Ryanair announces new route from Kaunas (3)

Ryanair announced a new Kaunas route to Zadar in Croatia , with a twice weekly service commencing...

Doctors from Kaunas Clinics hope for gamma knife economic return over the next couple of years

Neurosurgeons from Kaunas Clinics in Lithuania's second largest city of Kaunas are very happy with...

World’s first digital collector coin to feature signatories of the Act of Independence

The world‘s first blockchain -based digital collector coin created by the Bank of Lithuania is...

Norwegian specialised bank gets licence in Lithuania

Following the assessment and proposal of the Bank of Lithuania , AB Fjord Bank has been granted a...

MG Baltic wins reputation damage case against MP

Vilnius Regional Court on Tuesday ruled that a court of lower instance justly ruled early this year...